Top Windows 10 Tips and Tricks

Now that Windows 10 is out and millions of people are already running it, let’s take a look at some of the best hidden features, tips, and tricks in Microsoft’s latest (and last) major operating system was released to the public, and between the slightly confusing upgrade policy and phased rollouts, we’ve seen that the operating system is actually quite good. Since it aims to bridge the gap between mobile and desktop devices, there’s quite a lot that’s changed, but it’s still familiar and easy to use. There are quite a lot of nifty little features added that make it easier to use, but some of them are buried under settings that we usually wouldn’t look for, so here’s a couple of Windows 10 tips and tricks that you might just find useful!

Set File Explorer To Open ‘This PC’

Windows 8/8.1 got rid of the ‘My Computer’ icon we’ve all been used to for years, but it did give you the option to place an icon that leads to ‘This PC’, which was basically the same. You can also get that icon back on Windows 10 by the following process: Right Click Desktop>Click ‘Personalize’>Click ‘Themes’>On the right side, click ‘Go to Desktop icon settings’, then click whatever icons you want to be shown on the desktop. You can then pin these icons to the Start Menu.

Instead, if you prefer not having more icons, you can simply make the ‘File Explorer’ button on the Start Menu lead to ‘This PC’. To do this, you need to:

Step 1 – Open any Windows Explorer window and click the ‘View’ tab on the top ribbon.

Step 2 – Click ‘Options’ on the extended ribbon, on the top right.

Step 3 – In the ‘General’ tab, use the dropdown menu next to ‘Open File Explorer to:’ to select ‘This PC’.

Remove Search Bar and Task View Button From Taskbar

Microsoft is betting big on their virtual assistant Cortana for all devices, and even though she’s pretty awesome, some people might not like the extra clutter caused by the Search Bar on the Taskbar. You can always just open the Start Menu and type anything to do the same. To remove it, you need to right click the Taskbar, then under ‘Search’, select either ‘Hidden’ or ‘Show Search icon’.

Similarly, the new Task View feature on Windows 10 also gets a separate button that many might not like. To remove it, again right click the Taskbar and untick ‘Show Task View button’.

Customize Command Prompt

Top-Windows-10-Tips-and-Tricks-Customize-Command-Prompt

The spartan looking Command Prompt can finally be customized in Windows 10. You can select from options like text color, background color, font, size, opacity and more. Just open the Command Prompt and right click the top bar, then select ‘Properties’.

Background Scrolling

It’s pretty annoying when a popup takes away your attention and deactivates the window you’re using so you need to click on it again to scroll through the page. Windows 10 gets rid of this problem by a feature called Background Scrolling. Now even if the window isn’t active, if your cursor is on it, you can scroll through the page. Pretty cool, right? Here’s how you enable it:

Step 1 – Go to All Settings, Devices, then Mouse & touchpad.

Step 2 – Turn on the option that says ‘Scroll inactive windows when I hover over them.’

Resize Start Menu

Windows 10 is a departure from the full screen Start Menu found in Windows 8/8.1, but if you want, you can still set it to be full screen. Now what isn’t immediately apparent is that the Start Menu can be resized as well! All you need to do is move the cursor to the edge of the Start Menu and drag it to the size you want.

Background App Manager

Top-Windows-10-Tips-and-Tricks-Background-App-Manager

Similar to Windows 10 Mobile, the full desktop version also gives you the option to restrict which apps run in the background. So you can stop say, Weather or Sports from running if you don’t need them. Simply navigate to All Settings>Privacy>Background Apps and then select which apps you want to stop running in the background.

Timed Screenshots

Top-Windows-10-Tips-and-Tricks-Timed-Screenshots

Windows 10 adds the very cool feature of taking timed screenshots. Basically you can add a small delay in seconds, after which the screenshot is taken. Just open the Snipping Tool, click ‘Delay’, select your desired delay period and then take the screenshot.

Desktop Shortcuts on Command Prompt

Customization isn’t the only feature that’s been added to Command Prompt. You can now use desktop shortcuts like CTRL + C, CTRL + V and more on it. This is an absolute godsend for someone who needs to type out a long list of commands, now you can copy paste it just like any other text.

So there you have it, small yet pretty cool and unknown features that Windows 10 has brought with it! We’ll keep updating the list if anything else comes up, so stay tuned and do let us know what you thought of the article!

Asus Chrome Box Cloud-based Google’s Chrome OS

The Asus Chrome Box puts the Cloud-based world of Google’s Chrome OS into a compact, attractive black box. For its low starting price, you get a decent performance for everyday tasks and a good assortment of ports and connections.

With easy out-of-the-box setup, integrated virus and malware protection and feature-enhancing updates, ASUS Chrome box starts up in seconds to get you to your favorite websites and apps instantly. And why a box? Because with a box it houses a processor powerful enough for ultrafast multitasking performance in Chrome OS and the connectivity options to choose your own screen size, connect to multiple displays at once and even attach to any VESA-mountable monitor or HD TV. All this starting at only $179, ASUS Chrome box is the always-new computer that just makes sense.

A Simpler and Smarter Digital Life

ASUS Chrome box boots up in a flash and synchronizes instantly with your existing Chrome services to get you closer to the internet than ever before. With 100GB of free Google Drive space, access all your data and files in the cloud simply by logging into your Google account wherever you are.

Small in Size, Big on Features

It may be the world’s smallest Chrome computer, but ASUS Chrome box is big on connectivity. It comes with high performance 802.11 b/g/n dual-band wireless, four USB 3.0 ports for fast data transfer, HDMI and DisplayPort for connecting to the latest displays and HDTVs, including support for dual displays and an SD card reader for easily accessing stored photos and documents.

A More Beautiful Web Experience

ASUS Chrome box supports up to 4K UHD playback, letting you enjoy the best quality content from the web1. Kick back and relax as you browse the web, watch movies and shows on Netflix, or view photos from your SD card. And with a wide assortment of offline apps, ASUS Chrome box lets you edit documents, play games and use other popular apps without an internet connection.

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Getting Started

When booting Chrome box up, browsing the web or performing your essential tasks, it’s all about speed when it comes to Chrome OS. It gets you closer to what you want to do, simply boot up Chromebox and go.

Personalized Access with Parental Controls

Personalized data access makes ASUS Chromebox the ideal family device. Easily switch between accounts while ensuring each person’s data is kept private and secure; while parental controls ensure safe, family-friendly web surfing.

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Features-at-a-Glance

  • 4th gen Intel processors deliver the best performance for Chrome OS
  • HDMI and DisplayPort for dual display support and up to 4k playback1
  • Lightweight, small form design that supports VESA mount
  • USB 3.0 ports to easily share data from USB drives and devices
  • Dual-band Wireless-N connectivity for streaming HD media and seamless web surfing
  • Instant boot up in seconds saves you time
  • Chrome OS for a simplified, secure web experience that syncs all your Chrome services instantly and lets you use apps offline

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ASUS Chrome box Wireless Keyboard and Mouse

Specially-designed for ASUS Chrome box, control your Chrome box with a high-quality ASUS wireless keyboard and mouse.

Google’s Chromebit Turns Any TV Into a Chromebook

Google just introduced a whole new kind of Chromebook OS computer—a dongle that plugs into any HDMI-equipped display. It’s called a Chromebit, and it isn’t your run-of-the-mill streaming stick. For under $100, you’re looking at a full computer that plugs right into your TV.

“Get more done and worry less.” That’s what teachers, businesses, and everyday people have told us they can do, thanks to Chromebooks. Since we introduced them four years ago, Chromebooks have made computers faster, simpler, and more secure, while eliminating everyday hassles like waiting for your computer to boot up, having to constantly charge it, and remembering to install software updates. And a lot of people love them—Chromebooks were the best selling laptops on Amazon last holiday season, and teachers and students made them the #1 device in schools last year.
Chromebit-and-Chromebook-Flip-600x300

Quality and affordability

You shouldn’t have to choose between a computer that performs well and one that you can afford. Today we’re introducing two new devices that meet both criteria: the Haier Chromebook 11 (available at Amazon) and the Hisense Chromebook (available at Walmart). These new Chromebooks are fast, lightweight, have long-life batteries and are available for pre-order today for $149.

They join new partners like TRUE, XOLO, and Nexian and our existing range of Chrome devices —ranging from 11.6” Chromebooks for $199 to 15” Chromebooks for $499 rolling out over the next few months from partners like Acer, AOPEN, ASUS, Dell, HP, Lenovo and LG.

A Chromebook you’ll flip for

We’re also excited about the ASUS Chromebook Flip. A premium, all-metal convertible, it’s ultra-portable—just 15mm thin and weighing less than two pounds. The Chromebook Flip has a great keyboard and a touch screen for immersive experiences like gaming and educational apps. It will be available later this spring for $249.
AsusChromebook10_Silver_1000

A little bit more…

This summer, ASUS will launch a new type of Chrome device: the Chromebit. Smaller than a candy bar, the Chromebit is a full computer that will be available for less than $100. By simply plugging this device into any display, you can turn it into a computer. It’s the perfect upgrade for an existing desktop and will be really useful for schools and businesses.
Group_Asus_Chromestick_
So whether you’re looking for a smaller Chrome device that packs a big punch or a laptop that can do back bends, there’s a Chromebook for you…and for everyone else, too.

How can you protect yourself while online?

When sending confidential information over the Internet such as usernames, passwords, or credit card numbers only send it securely. To verify this look for a small lock (Internet browser security lock) in the bottom right corner of your browser window or next to the address bar (as shown below). If visible, this lock should also be in the locked position and not unlocked.

Internet Explorer 7.0 secure address bar
Internet Explorer 7 secure address bar

We also suggest making sure the URL begins with https as shown above.

While the lock is in the lock position, data is encrypted, which helps anyone from understanding the data if it’s intercepted. When no lock is visible or in the unlocked position all information is plaintext and if intercepted could be read. If a web page is not secure, such as an online forum, use a password you wouldn’t use with protected sites such as your online banking website.

E-mail is not encrypted

Websites should not transmit confidential data over e-mail, such as passwords, credit card information, etc. E-mail is not encrypted and if intercepted by a third-party could be read.

Be aware of phishing scams

Familiarized yourself with phishing scams and techniques, which are used to trick you into divulging your account information. Online banking sites, Paypal, eBay, Amazon, and other popular sites that require logins are popular targets.

Use a safe password

Websites that store confidential data, such as an online bank site need to use strong passwords. Also, it is highly recommended that you use a different password for each website that requires a login. If you need help remembering your passwords consider using a password manager.

Use caution when accepting or agreeing to prompts

When prompted to install any program or add-on make sure to read and understand the agreement before clicking on the Ok button. If you do not understand the agreement or feel it is not necessary to install the program cancel or close the window.

Additionally, when installing any program watch for any check box that asks if it’s ok to install a third-party program, toolbar, etc. These are never required and often cause more issues than good. Leave these boxes unchecked.

Be cautious where you’re logging in from

Business

Your place of work can install key loggers or use other methods of monitoring the computer while online. Someone who has access to this information could read these logs and gather usernames and passwords. Also, do not store any passwords in your browser if your computer is shared with other coworkers.

Wireless network

When on a wireless network realize that all information being sent to and from your computer can be intercepted and read by someone nearby. Prevent this from happening by only logging into a secure network using WEP or WPA. If this is a home wireless network, make sure it is secure.

Friends house

Be concerned when logging into an account from a friends computer. A computer or network you are not familiar with could intentionally or unintentionally log usernames and passwords. Finally, when logging into any site on a friends computer never save the password information on their browser.

Be aware of those around you

While at work, school, library, or anywhere that has people around who could look at the monitor be cautious of anyone shoulder surfing. Someone could watch you type in your password, which would give them access to your account.

If you need everything displayed on the screen to remain private, consider a privacy filter for the display.

Update Internet browser plugins

Often many attackers find security vulnerabilities through browser plugins such as Adobe Flash. Make sure all installed Internet plug-ins are up-to-date.

Secure saved passwords

Make sure to store passwords and login information in a secure area. Never write login information on a sticky note or in a text file that is not encrypted.

To save your passwords we recommend using a password manager, which stores all login information and securely encrypts and password protects that information.

When saving password information in a browser, it may be visible by anyone who has access to your Internet browser. For example, without a master password setup in Firefox anyone can see all stored passwords.

Use a third-party service to confirm the safety and security of a page

We recommend the free Web of Trust (WOT) tool to verify the safety of all websites on the Internet.

Box : Free Online File Storage and Collaboration

Box is a cloud platform that helps you securely store, share and manage all your company’s files. Whether you need to secure confidential business information, to develop a custom mobile application or are trying to simplify paper-based office processes, Box can help you do more with your content.

Box.net provides online data storage, and collaboration. Cloud-storage service Box already beats the likes of Dropbox and SkyDrive by offering 10GB of free storage to anyone who signs up for a personal account. (Those two competitors give you just 2GB and 7GB, respectively.)

Simple, Secure Sharing

Box lets you quickly and easily work securely with anyone – even if they’re outside your firewall. Share large files, view and comment on any kind of document, and connect with co-workers – no matter what device they use.

Box Free Online File Storage and Collaboration (1)

  • Quick and Easy File Sharing Stop sending insecure, large attachments via email. Instead, use customized Box shared links with passwords, expiration dates and restricted download access.
  • Start Projects Fast Instantly create shared folders for projects of any size, and control what each person has access to. Manage co-owners, editors and view-only collaborators in a few clicks.
  • Share Anywhere Create a secure link from anywhere – web, mobile or desktop – and instantly adjust the security of your files on any device.

Share Externally

Box makes it simple to securely share files and folders.

  • Drag and Drop Files Drag files into a Box folder and quickly share a link with external suppliers, vendors and partners.
  • Manage File Access Set permissions to limit document access with shared links, ranging from internal only, users in a folder, or open to everyone with the link.
  • Share Externally Invite external parties to collaborate and contribute, no matter what phone or tablet they use.

Box Free Online File Storage and Collaboration (2)

Box Free Online File Storage and Collaboration (1)Here are some of the features of Box.Net

  • You can create workspaces on which you and your friends can collaborate.
  • You can create up to 5 collaboration folders.
  • You can easily share the files with your friends.
  • Provides capability to create multiple layers of folders.
  • You can search inside your documents.

The features provided by Box.Net for free service are pretty basic, and the space limit of 1GB for free accounts is too small. The more advanced features are limited to paid accounts. If you do not need advanced document collaboration, then you can try Windows Sky Live to get 25GB of online space, or use DropBox to keep your files synced and backed up, with up to 2GB of free online space.

You can try Box.net here.

5 Tips to Stay Safe on Internet

As the Internet becomes an increasingly integral part of daily life, questions about privacy and security on the Internet are on the rise. Keeping your personal information, private data and finances safe can be difficult, but by following a few tips, you can avoid the vast majority of scams, spyware and privacy breaches.

Tip 1. Be Aware

The best tool to avoid spyware and stay safe on the Internet is your own brain. Free software with no potential upgrades or strings attached, websites that are covered in flashy ads, and free Wi-Fi in an unexpected place are all signs that something may be wrong, and ignoring that intuition can get you in trouble. By staying aware of what you are doing, and thinking about your security while you live your online life, you stand a better chance of avoiding potentially dangerous situations.

internet safetyTip 2: Check for website safety

The Internet can be dangerous because so many websites require your personal information to either log in to your account or to complete a transaction. Hackers, thieves and spyware programmers realize this and often try to intercept your information during these transactions, so make sure you are always dealing with secure websites and companies. First, only provide your information to reputable businesses, then ensure that the company’s website uses a Web address that starts with “https” and has a padlock symbol either in the address bar or at the bottom of the browser. This means that the site encrypts your information, making the data nearly useless to any thieves or hackers who may intercept the transmission.

Tip 3: Choose strong and varied passwords

For most people, a password is the strongest protection to ward off hackers and thieves, and yet so many choose passwords that are barely worth the time it takes to enter them. When creating a password, always use a mix of letters and numbers, and include a symbol if the website allows it. While more difficult to remember, this will make your password almost impossible to guess.

More importantly, you have to use different passwords for different websites. Think about how often you use the same username and password for many online accounts. Hackers specifically target low-security sites to gain access to large lists of usernames and corresponding passwords, knowing that many people use the same combination of credentials for things like online banking.

Additionally, take advantage of any two-factor authentication offered by these sites. This requires not only a password to log in, but a code that’s sent to a dedicated device or to your smartphone as an SMS message. This makes it very difficult for a third party to hack into your account.

Tip 4: What is spyware? How do I stop it?

Spyware probably poses the biggest threat to privacy and security on the Internet, yet so few people really know what it is or how it works. Put simply, spyware is any piece of software that records your actions or information without your knowledge. Some spyware is fairly benign, tracking browsing history and keeping the data it receives anonymous, while other spyware is specifically designed to get your online banking credentials so thieves can clean out your accounts.

Because it’s almost impossible to avoid spyware on your own, having anti-spware and antivirus programs running on your computer is a must. These programs will automatically scan any piece of incoming software for malicious signatures and block the installation if the program looks suspect. They’ll also scan existing files and monitor Internet traffic to ensure that spyware isn’t hiding somewhere on the machine and sending your information to some hacker’s terminal.

There are free anti-spyware programs out there, but you have to be careful when trying to save a buck or two — quite a few of these programs are really Trojan horses in disguise, looking to infect your machine instead of protect it. Instead, your best option is to go with an industry leader. These companies have no interest in scamming you, and are big enough to ensure that their databases are constantly updated as new threats emerge. The best options also offer a free trial, so you can see the anti-spyware program in action before paying some of your hard-earned cash.

Tip 5: It’s not all about spyware and scams

With all this talk about spyware, hackers and Internet security, it’s important to remember that most people with privacy issues on the Internet put themselves in that position. Think about social networking sites and just how much personal information you have posted there. If someone were trying to steal your identity and needed your father’s middle name or where you went to elementary school — two commonly used security questions — you need to think about how a thief could locate those facts. If you’re concerned about Internet privacy, you have to consider staying away from social networking sites, minimizing the information you put out there, or maximizing privacy settings on these sites.

Complete privacy and security on the Internet is a tough goal to reach, these tips will help you go a long way toward keeping yourself safe. Millions of people use the Internet, and thieves will inevitably go for easy targets. People who give even the smallest amount of thought to security and privacy, and take steps in that regard, will find themselves passed over as thieves search out greener pastures.

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Protect Yourself Online – Internet Safety Tips

Protect Yourself Online - Internet Safety TipsInternet threats continue to pose a problem for anyone that surfs the Internet — and yes, that includes you reading the headline and thinking you know it all. In this article we will show you how to protect yourself using some “best practices” for safely surfing the Internet, all without spending a dime.

Background on Internet Threats

Anyone can throw around terms such as “spyware” and “viruses”, but what exactly are they? It helps to know before trying to figure out how best to avoid such problems. Here are the basics:

  • Malware: Short for “malicious software”. Resides and runs on a user’s computer without their consent or knowledge. Malware can be used as an all-inclusive term for viruses, spyware, keyloggers, worms, and Trojan horses, and other Internet threats.
  • Spyware: A type of malware that collects information about users, including personal information and habits (sites they visited). It can also trigger popups and install additional malware.
  • Virus: A type of malware that can replicate itself and infect other computers through a network or media (such as a flash drive). Viruses can do multiple harmful things to a user’s computer, such as taking it over and using it for malicious purposes.

Three Steps to Internet Safety

This guide will take you through three relatively simple steps to protect yourself on the Internet:

  1. Install Mozilla Firefox
  2. Install the McAfee Site Advisor tool
  3. Change your online habits

Step One: Install Mozilla Firefox

Yes, “Install Mozilla Firefox” may be clich; however, there is sound reasoning why this is a good piece of software. Let’s cut the marketing nonsense — here are the tangible things I like about Firefox:

  • Pop-up blocker: Pop-ups are perhaps the most annoying form of advertising, and Firefox takes care of them for you. It will let you know a pop-up was blocked in case you were expecting one.
  • Unsafe site warnings: If you go to a website that is fraudulent, untrusted, or has known security problems, Firefox will actually prevent the site from loading.
  • Integration with anti-virus software: Firefox works with your resident anti-virus program to scan downloaded files for security threats.
  • Automatic updates: Firefox automatically updates itself, so your defenses stay current.
  • Private browsing: Firefox normally remembers what websites you visited, however in private browsing mode (which is easy to toggle on and off), it will not remember anything you did. This feature is handy when logging into banking sites that you want to leave no trace of on your computer (or someone else’s). Private Browsing can be activated from the tools menu and clicking “Start Private Browsing”; do the same to turn it off:

Without further delay, follow this link to Mozilla’s official website and download Firefox for your computer.

Firefox is a small 8MB download. Click Download and thensave the file to your computer to a location you know (such as My Documents). Double-click the downloaded file and install Firefox with the default settings. Done? Great! Those familiar with Internet Explorer should be able to adapt to Firefox without much trouble — it gets natural after a day.

Step Two: Install the McAfee Site Advisor Tool


Certain websites are created with malicious intent; for example, some might try to infect your computer with malware and others might be fake phishing sites designed to steal your personal information. McAfee, a computer security company, has a Site Advisor tool that displays ratings next to links in search engines (such as Google and Yahoo), indicating whether or not the listed sites are safe (see here for thorough information on how it works). Site Advisor works with both Mozilla Firefox and Internet Explorer. Simply download and then install McAfee Site Advisor using the default settings (leave everything as-is, though I recommend unchecking the option to install the unnecessary Yahoo toolbar).

Once installed, restart Firefox and test Site Advisor out. Make sure your default search provider is set to McAfee first — in the top right next to the search box, click the down arrow and select McAfee Secure Search:

Now search for something and check out the results page — each link has a little icon next to it that indicates whether the site is safe or not.

Green means good, yellow is caution, and red means unsafe/untrusted. A question mark indicates the site has not been scanned yet. As a rule of thumb, only click on the green links.

Below is an example of what search results look like after installing the Site Advisor tool:

And yes, NotebookReview.com is totally safe — but you knew that.

The Site Advisor tool is great to have when you are searching for things you do not usually search for (and thus might be unfamiliar with sites that come up). It never hurts to double-check. As always, use your judgment when clicking on links. If something is too good to be true, it is.

Step Three: Change Your Online HabitsProtect Yourself Online - Internet Safety Tips 2

The single greatest danger you face on the Internet is yourself. More specifically, there is no software that can compensate for your poor Internet safety habits.

Let’s start with how much critical information you willingly give away. This is the Internet — information posted online can be seen by almost anyone, and secure websites can be hacked. Even restricted pages such as your Facebook profile are not entirely safe — someone with access (such as your “friends”) could copy and paste the information to a Web page that isn’t truly private. The bottom line here is that you need to be extra careful with yourself on the Internet. Below are a few of the habits I see daily that present huge security risks to the users:

? Connecting to unsecured wireless networks: You know that coffee shop down the street that offers free Wi-Fi? That free Wi-Fi access could cost you a lot if it is unsecured (Windows will indicate whether a network is secured/unsecured when you try to connect). An unsecured connection is an open network that allows anyone to connect — information passed from your laptop to the wireless router and vice versa can be intercepted by people with the right tools since it is not encrypted. Additionally, network attacks can be made from other computers connected to the network.
Internet Safety Habit: Avoid unsecured Wi-Fi

? Accessing secure websites in public: Even on a secured network, remember that people can see what you type on your laptop screen. All it takes is one person to walk by with a camera phone and snap a picture of your online banking page. The same is true at your office, where all it takes is one nosy coworker poking over a cubicle wall or an unscrupulous network administrator spying on your workstation to snag your passwords.
Internet Safety Habit: Access secure websites only at home

? Saving personal information on shopping websites: Most shopping sites offer to save your credit card and address information for easier checkout in the future. While this is convenient for the few sites you shop at regularly, please do not opt to save info on every site you shop. Though the information is supposedly secured, successful hacking attempts have occurred in the past and personal data has been stolen. Also, there are too many stories of personal information getting “lost”.
Internet Safety Habit: Don’t save credit card numbers on shopping sites

? Posting personal information on social networking sites: I find it amusing that people post the details of their personal lives on social networking sites such as Facebook, give a platoon of their “friends” access, and then complain about privacy issues. Am I the only one that can see the issue here?
Internet Safety Habit: Only post information online you want everyone to see

? Keep your computer personal: Internet browsers such as Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox make it easy to store password and form information (such as names and addresses used in order forms). Anyone that opens the web browser on your computer can check your browsing history, visit your “secure” sites (like your Web-based email) and automatically log in as you because you opted to have the browser save your password. Avoid storing passwords, or better yet, password-protect your computer and lock it when not in use (press the Windows key and L to lock your computer). Make a second account on your computer for other people to use so your information is kept separate, and make sure that account is password-protected and not an administrator.
Internet Safety Habit: Never save passwords on any computer that you share

? Do not install software you do not explicitly want: Many software vendors try to sneak additional pieces of software on your system during the install process. For example, toolbars for your Internet browser, updater tools, and other unnecessary (and annoying) items. If you wanted those pieces of software, you would have installed them on your own.
Internet Safety Habit: Install as little software as possible